What do you when your ex partner doesn’t bring your kids back?

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  • #38744 Report

    Leeler
    Participant

    Hi, I just wondered if anybody has been through a similar experience.

    We had a arrangement whereby my ex would have the kids every other weekend, and I also agreed to extra time during school holidays etc. However, a couple of weeks ago he refused to bring them back and I had to go round and collect them myself, and even then I was challenged for trying to bring them home.  This is not the first time he has done this.  So, what with the added pressure of the  lockdown and the virus I am too scared to let them stay at his, mainly because of the virus because I want them to stay at home, but partly because I’m scared if I let them stay he won’t bring them back.

    Also, he has been threatening to take them off me, and he has said is going to call the police, threatens to get me a criminal record, has said that he is going to report me for not adhering to the Lockdown and social distancing restrictions (which are not true), and the he reported me to social services to say that my kids are in danger (from me), but thankfully it was taken any further.

    So that’s why I can’t let him take them because he won’t bring them back, especially as the schools are closed, and the virus.  But I’m thinking longterm.  Does anyone know if I can get something from the courts detailing times when he can have them.

    Thanks

    #38746 Report

    Emma8
    Participant

    You need to go to apply to court for a child arrangement order where he’ll have set days and times visitation.
    the form is a C100 to apply for family court

    Can also apply for prohibited steps order If the dad threatens to take the children away from you.
    hope this helps

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by Emma8.
    #38763 Report

    Solomama
    Participant

    His behaviour is unacceptable, it is threats to make you feel intimidated, makes him feel in control.
    Keep a record of his actions including dates.
    Remain adult and calm, don’t react to him, I know it’s hard but it will not help you to retaliate.
    Let him make the calls he threatens to make; it will be clear to them his purpose and you clearly have no reason to feel scared by this. Your concern is clear you want to protect your children, understandable and easy to justify based on his actions.
    please see below, this will help if needed. Hope this supports you.

    <span style=”font-size: 14pt; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’, sans-serif; color: #333333;”>1.<span style=”font-stretch: normal; font-size: 7pt; line-height: normal; font-family: ‘Times New Roman’;”>   </span></span><span style=”font-size: 14pt; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’, sans-serif; color: #333333;”>Government guidance issued alongside the Stay at Home Rules on 23</span><span style=”font-size: 10.5pt; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’, sans-serif; color: #333333;”>rd</span><span style=”font-size: 14pt; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’, sans-serif; color: #333333;”> March deals specifically with child contact arrangements. It says:
    <b>“Where parents do not live in the same household, children under 18 can be moved between their parents’ homes.”
    </b>This establishes an exception to the mandatory ‘stay at home’ requirement; <u>it does not, however, mean that children <b>must </b>be moved between homes.</u> The decision whether a child is to move between parental homes is for the child’s parents to make after a sensible assessment of the circumstances, including the child’s present health, the risk of infection and the presence of any recognised vulnerable individuals in one household or the other.</span>

    <span style=”font-size: 14pt; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’, sans-serif; color: #333333;”>2.<span style=”font-stretch: normal; font-size: 7pt; line-height: normal; font-family: ‘Times New Roman’;”>   </span></span><span style=”font-size: 14pt; font-family: ‘Trebuchet MS’, sans-serif; color: #333333;”>More generally, the best way to deal with these difficult times will be for parents to communicate with one another about their worries, and what they think would be a good, practical solution. Many people are very worried about Coronavirus and the health of themselves, their children and their extended family. Even if some parents think it is safe for contact to take place, it might be entirely reasonable for the other parent to be genuinely worried about this.</span>

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